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Common Questions


VTAC Offers


  • I'VE RECEIVED A UNI OFFER - WHAT SHOULD I DO NOW?

    If you've recently received an offer for a place at university – congratulations! Meeting all the entry requirements is no mean feat. Now that you have an offer, it's time to make some decisions and get started on the next stage of your education. We've put together some handy tips and answers to common questions that will help you on your way. Please note, this article is tailored for Victorian residents who have applied through the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) to study at university in 2017.

  • HOW ARE OFFERS DETERMINED?

    In any given offer round you can receive a maximum of one offer. This will be made for the highest course on your preference list for which you meet all selection criteria. So, if you meet all selection criteria for your first preference, you will receive an offer for your first preference. If you aren't eligible for your first preference (e.g. your ATAR isn't high enough or you haven't completed prerequisites), you'll receive an offer for the next highest course on your list that you do meet the eligibility criteria for. Round 1 is the main offer round and this is when the majority of offers are made. Not all universities participate in or have places available for subsequent offer rounds.

  • HOW DO I FIND OUT IF I RECEIVED AN OFFER?

    For Victorian applicants*, the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) will email you advising of your offer. This information will also be available by logging into your VTAC account. The institution that you’ve received an offer from will contact you separately with instructions on how to accept your offer and enrol in the course. Your offer will also be published in newspapers if you’ve opted in and given VTAC permission to release your offer.

    * Applicants from outside Victoria should receive offer information from the tertiary admission centre relevant to their state or territory.

  • HOW DO I ACCEPT MY OFFER?

    If you're happy with your offer, you can accept it by enrolling in the course. Please note, each institution has its own procedures for enrolment. Within two days of receiving your offer, you should receive information from the relevant institution on how to enrol and the enrolment deadline – if you don't receive this information, contact the institution. Ensure that you complete your enrolment before the deadline, otherwise you risk losing your place in the course. Note that receiving an offer does not confirm your enrolment. You must follow the enrolment instructions sent to you by the institution to secure your place.

  • HOW DO I DECLINE MY OFFER?

    To decline an offer, you don't need to do anything; if you do not enrol in the course by the enrolment deadline, your offer will automatically lapse. But, you should only decline your offer if you are sure you wouldn’t undertake the course even if you don't receive any other offers. Receiving an offer in subsequent offer rounds is not guaranteed so if you don't accept your Round 1 offer and then don't receive another offer in a subsequent round, you may miss out on studying at university this year. 

  • HOW DO I DEFER MY OFFER?

    Many institutions give you the option to defer your offer, but still retain your place at university, enabling you to have a break from study before commencing your course. The length of time you can defer for varies according to the institution but Deakin University, for example, enables you to defer your studies for up to two years (depending on what sort of offer you received). Note that not all institutions allow deferment. To find out if it's possible, what you need to do to defer, and what the deadline is, make sure you check with the relevant institution. 

  • WHAT HAPPENS IF I GET AN OFFER TO A COURSE I DON'T REALLY WANT TO STUDY?

    It's still advisable to accept your Round 1 offer. Doing so will at least secure your place in something and you will still be eligible to receive offers in subsequent offer rounds for courses that you preferenced above the one that you accept. Whilst offers in subsequent rounds are not guaranteed, if you do receive an offer in more than one round you can choose which one to accept as long as you do so within the deadline for each round. If you accept your offer, then receive another offer in a later round, you can either keep your first offer and not accept your new one, or withdraw from your first offer and accept your new one. Please note if you want to withdraw from a course, you need to contact the relevant institution for instructions and you must withdraw before the census date, otherwise fees will apply. If you don't receive a more preferred offer in subsequent rounds – don't worry! Even if you don't think your Round 1 offer course is ideal, you may be able to use it as a pathway into your ultimate course (subject to availability and meeting the required academic standard).

  • WHAT HAPPENS IF I DON'T GET AN OFFER?

    If you don't get an offer in Round 1, you may still get one in subsequent rounds. But you may want to consider changing your preferences and adding some courses that could act as potential pathways to the course you ultimately want to get in to (subject to availability and meeting the required academic standard). Check the VTAC website for Change of Preference dates. If you were quite sure you'd get an offer but didn't, double check that you met all the prerequisites and completed the selection requirements for the course. If you did, you can contact the institution to find out why you didn't receive an offer. 

  • WHY WOULD I CHANGE MY PREFERENCES AFTER RECEIVING AN OFFER?

    As previously mentioned, you may want to change your preferences by adding courses to your list if you didn't receive any offers in Round 1. You may also want to consider changing your preferences if you've changed your mind about what your first course preference is. If you receive an offer for your first preference in Round 1, you won't receive any more offers for courses lower on your preference list in subsequent rounds unless you change your preferences. So, if you've decided your first preference is not your most preferred course and want to be considered for other courses in subsequent offer rounds, you need to remove this course as your first preference and replace it with your new preferred course. If you are going to change your preferences, keep in mind the Change of Preference deadlines. Note that you can change your preferences even if you've already received an offer and enrolled in a course. 

  • WHAT HAPPENS IF I'VE REALISED I'M INELIGIBLE FOR THE COURSE I REALLY WANT TO STUDY?

    Consider pathway options. Course advisers at the relevant institution will be able to suggest suitable pathway options based on your situation. It may be an option, for example, to accept the best (and most similar) course offer that you receive, commence the course and apply to transfer to your chosen course at a later time (subject to availability and meeting the required academic standard). In most cases, students who transfer from pathway courses are eligible to receive credit from the study they've already completed. 

Entry requirements


  • WHAT IS A PREREQUISITE?

    A prerequisite is a subject that must be successfully completed to be considered for selection into a course.

  • WHAT IS A VTAC PERSONAL STATEMENT?

    The VTAC personal statement is a way for applicants to provide selection officers with any information relevant to their application that was not collected as part of the VTAC online application.

  • WHAT IS THE AUSTRALIAN LAW SCHOOLS ENTRANCT TEST (ALSET)?

    The ALSET is compulsory for most non-school leavers applying for entry into any of Deakin University's undergraduate law degree programs.

  • WHAT IS THE SPECIAL TERTIARY ADMISSIONS TEST (STAT)?

    The STAT is a test for non-school leavers, designed to assess a range of competencies commonly considered important for success in tertiary study.

  • WHAT IS GRADUATE ENTRY?

    A graduate-entry course requires prior completion of an undergraduate degree for entry.

Fees and scholarships


  • WHAT IS A COMMONWEALTH SUPPORTED PLACE (CSP)?

    A CSP is a university place for which the government makes a contribution towards the cost of a student's education.

  • WHAT IS HECS-HELP?

    HECS-HELP stands for 'Higher Education Contribution Scheme-Higher Education Loan Program'. It is a loan scheme that helps eligible CSP students pay for tuition costs.

  • WHAT TYPES OF SCHOLARSHIPS ARE AVAILABLE?

    Deakin offers a range of generous scholarships to assist in making higher education accessible for everyone. Find out more about the types of scholarships available

What kind of student am I?


  • WHO IS A SCHOOL LEAVER (CURRENT YEAR 12) STUDENT?

    You are a current Year 12 student if you are currently studying VCE (or Adult VCE), senior level VCAL, an interstate Australian Year 12 certificate, a New Zealand Year 12 certificate or the International Baccalaureate.

  • WHO IS A NON-SCHOOL LEAVER?

    You are a non-school leaver if you are currently having a gap year, studying at another university, TAFE institution or independent tertiary college, in the workforce or not currently employed. 

  • WHO IS AN UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT?

    An undergraduate student is one who is undertaking their first course of study at a university.

  • WHO IS A POSTGRADUATE STUDENT?

    Postgraduate students are those who have completed an undergraduate degree or gained professional experience considered to be the equivalent of a relevant tertiary program.

  • WHO IS A MATURE-AGE STUDENT?

    You are classified as a mature age student if you are moving into tertiary study and are 21 years or over on 1 January of the year of intake. You may not have studied before, but you can apply for undergraduate study through Deakin's Access and Equity Program.

  • WHY WOULD I CHANGE MY PREFERENCES?

    There may be a number of reasons why you want to change your preferences, such as:

    You have changed your mind 

    There may be a different course that you think best suits your interests or perhaps you've decided on an alternative location to suit your lifestyle or desired university experience. Just make sure you have met the prerequisites and any other additional requirements for the courses you want to add.

    You have done better than you expected

    Well done! You may want to include a course you didn't think you could get into, but ensure that the courses you put down are those you want to study, as opposed to those you are now eligible for. Remember you should only put down courses that you would actually consider studying.

    You didn't do quite as well as you expected

    Don't worry! There are always options to get into your desired course, whether it be looking at a different campus or considering a TAFE pathway option. Remember, if your ATAR is just a little below what you need, it is still really important to keep it on your preference list, as the clearly-in ATAR might move up or down. Clearly-in ATARs are based on the demand for the course, at that particular institute. So, the clearly-in ATAR for any given year will depend on how many students choose the course.